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Sunday, 25 August 2013

1939 Poland's Drastic Solution to the Jewish Q.




Dr. Leon Surzyński —————— Emil Sommerstein 

Poles Thrust Threat To Jewry at Powers
Warsaw, Jan. 28 (JTA)—A Polish warning was given to the Western powers today that if they do not assist the emigration of Jews from Poland, then "we will have to solve the problem in our own way." The statement was made in the Sejm (chamber of deputies) by Deputy Surzynski of the government party, rapporteur on the Foreign Office estimates, who complained that Western governments were considering only the problem of emigration from Germany and were neglecting the Polish question despite its urgency. The Jews must remember, the government spokesman asserted, that the Polish people will carry out measures dictated by their own interests, despite difficulties, unless a solution of the emigration problem is achieved soon.
During the debate, Jewish Deputy Emil Sommerstein declared that the Jews regarded the emigration problem as being of extreme importance, but were not responsible for the conditions which created both the necessity of emigration and the difficulties of finding outlets. Stating that the world powers were not disposed to pay premiums for anti-Jewish persecution, he asserted that a policy of discrimination acted as a brake on efforts to increase emigration possibilities. He sharply criticized the attitude of Polish consulates in Germany in refusing protection to Polish Jews persecuted and deported by the Nazis, and also attacked the administration of the law for denationalization of Polish Jews living abroad.

The Sentinel (The American Jewish Weekly, Chicago), Vol. 128,
No. 2, February 2, 1939, p.39.(enlarged) see also JTA


Poles Warn Western Powers to Speed Exodus of Jews or See Drastic Solution



3 comments:

  1. "During the debate, Jewish Deputy Emil Sommerstein [...] sharply criticized the attitude of Polish consulates in Germany in refusing protection to Polish Jews persecuted and deported by the Nazis, and also attacked the administration of the law for denationalization of Polish Jews living abroad."

    That happened in reaction to Hitler's "Polenaktion" which took place during the previous months. The "Polenaktion" was about returning the Polish Jews living in the Reich to their Polish homeland.

    Context:

    - 25 March 1938: Poland declares all passports not valuable from Jewish Poles since 5 years abroad (i.e. the law for denationalization of Polish Jews living abroad which Sommerstein was talking about). On March 25, 1938, the Polish Sejm passed a law according to which any Polish citizen who had not visited Poland for five consecutive years could be deprived of his citizenship, unless he passport was specifically renewed. The original aim of this ruling was to prevent Polish Jews in Vienna from entering Poland after the German occupation of Austria on March 13, 1938.

    - 6 Oct 1938: Poland announces renewal for passports limit for 29 October. On October 6 [1938] the Polish government decreed that those who did not have their passport renewed by October 29 would lose their Polish citizenship.

    - 26 Oct 1938: NS Foreign Office requests Gestapo send back Polish Jews from Germany.

    - 27/28 Oct 1938: Reich: 17,000 Polish Jews are deported back to Poland (they were the ones which Sommerstein called "the jews deported by the Nazis"). The Gestapo obliged, on the night of October 27/8, some 17,000 Polish Jews in Germany were rounded up. They were put on special trains and sent to the Polish border. There some of them were forced by the Germans to cross the border illegally; most, however, were simply shunted across the frontier in railway carriages.

    - Poland's action plans against Germany. The Polish government was extremely unhappy about the whole situation. Trying to pay the Germans back in their own coin, it threatened to expel German citizens from Poland, especially German Jewish refugees who had arrived from Germany in previous years.

    - 24 Jan 1939: Agreement for no further expulsion - temporary stay for the expelled in Germany to arrange their affairs. A way out was found (at least temporarily) when both countries agreed on January 24, 1939, that no further expulsion would take place, and that the Jewish expellees would be granted limited rights to visit Germany to wind up their affairs there or to arrange for final emigration to other countries. That was the end of the Polenaktion...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Plagiarism:

      You didn't cite the source of your copy and pasting: Yehuda Bauer

      Delete
  2. This weekend is the 116th anniversary of the First Zionist Congress. The beginning of international Zionist terrorism and the End Games

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