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Sunday, 20 October 2013

The gas chamber bigamists' story



Hungarian Jews Joseph Ungar and Matha Roth on their wedding day in 1942, Budapest.


These two Hungarian Jews were deported to different camps by the Nazis, likely in the first-half of 1944. Following the war each of them claimed they'd heard the other was killed. On the face of it, it appears the husband just headed straight off to Canada after the war, whilst his wife did return to Hungary. The husband, claiming his first wife was gassed, became a bigamist in 1953, taking a second wife in Canada. His first wife, who had given birth to his son in a "Nazi extermination camp" (Auschwitz?) which was murdered by the Germans, married a second husband in Hungary in 1948. Following the uprising against the Jewish-Soviet regime in Hungary in 1956, she and her second husband fled to New York where she learnt her first husband was still alive and living in Canada. She contacted him by telephone, after which they had a few meetings and discussed having their second marriages annulled. Eventually he decided to remain with his other wife, much to his first wife's disappointment, and no doubt her second husband's too.

This story about a couple who'd only be married two years before the deportation of the Hungarian Jews began and didn't bother looking for each other after the war, makes me wonder about what lengths the people who makes such claims as the following really went to to find their distant relatives: "we lost 43 of our family in the Holocaust"; "we lost 60 family members in the Holocaust"; "our family lost 70 family members."







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9 comments:

  1. In peacetime you tend to loose contact with family who are outside the first cousin range. After the war the displaced Jews were scattered to the US, Australia, South Africa, Palestine,the UK , Argentina and many of the " lost " second cousins would be untraceable and intermarry etc. Milliband found one of his long lost relatives in Moscow ! He is of course beatified by being the son of a " Holocaust survivor " who funnily enough left his mother and sister behind when he fled to England and they spent a relatively uneventful time in Nazi occupied Belgium

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  2. How do you know they weren't looking for each other? There were many cases when a simple misspelling of the name in the Red Cross offices meant that relatives didn't find each other.

    And anyways, "each of them claimed they'd heard the others was killed" so even if they didn't search, there is a reason for that.

    There were tens of thousands of stories like this after the war, involving non-Jews. Husband was reported dead, "widow" remarried, then husband returned from a Siberian POW camp sometime in the early '50s, only to find his wife and property now belonging to the woman's new man.

    "...and no doubt her second husband's too."

    You are simply full of hatred and malice. Sad.

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    1. You are missing the point that they were not killed and reported death. How many of the six million is not killed and reported death?

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    2. Do you have any evidence that this was a mass occuring? Or do you just take a freak newspaper story, and generalize.

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    3. Why don't you just stick to the facts. These Jews were reported death and not killed. So it is far to ask how many Jews have been reported death and were in fact not killed. Known is that (for example) Auschwitz was meant to be a transit center (as part of the broader plans of the Zionists since 1897 to execute the Final Solution) for Jews colonizing territory conquered by the Germans and to execute Russians and Poland and to have (Jewish) slave labor for the financing Rothschild company. Auschwitz as place for Zionist cockroaches to Holocaust Jews was not part of the planning permission.

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    4. "How do you know they weren't looking for each other?"

      Where would have been the natural place for them to have looked for each other, do you suppose? I'd suggest it was at their home in Budapest. I found a tragic tale in a declassified UK government file in Kew recently, about a former German soldier who was released by the Americans and went to look for his family at their home in the Russian Zone of Germany. Mr Ungar, on the other hand, just took off for the New World.

      ""...and no doubt her second husband's too."

      You are simply full of hatred and malice. Sad."


      Hardly!

      "Ferencz is not happy about it, but he knows I won't be happy unless I go back with Joseph," she said. "He was a good husband but Joseph was the first man in my life and I can't forget it."

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    5. "Where would have been the natural place for them to have looked for each other, do you suppose?"

      The Red Cross was, and is, the standard way of locating relatives. Another holocaust reunion story on their website: http://www.redcross.org/stories/saul-dreier

      War produces many strange stories, but this is no evidence that all or even more than a few thousand of the 5-6,000,000 persons that were accounted for as killed in the holocaust had survived. Newspapers must have run the above story exactly because it was a freak incident.

      If you have reason to believe that this happened on a large scale, please present the evidence for it.

      In my small town in Eastern Europe Jews were 10% of the population before the war, they were shipped to Auschwitz, and we only know about a handful of survivors. Half the deported population were children (7-8 children were the norm back then in families), and many were elderly, they were definitely not taken for "work".

      There is no trace of them after the war. Only able-bodied males and a few young females survived, about 30 out of 400. After the war a couple of men returned to look around, and saw that the entire community was gone, their property taken and given to gentiles. Two of them remained and tried to rebuild their lives, the rest took the next train back to the city, where they told their fellows that there's no-one at home. Then a Jewish emigration service organized their journey to America and Israel.

      The Jews never returned for the property, etc. There is zero evidence that, other than the handful of known survivors, anyone else survived.

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    6. Perhaps there were Jews from your town in "Eastern Europe" among the millions of Jews, one estimate puts it at 3,000,000, who arrived in just the US Zone of Germany in the years immediately following the war. General Patton suspected that the "[n]ew Jerusalem may occur in Bavaria".
      http://winstonsmithministryoftruth.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/planned-second-exodus.html

      I wouldn't expect you to tell me where you live, not even generally, but was your town occupied by the Soviets before the Germans rolled in?

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    7. Do not think that our Anonymous at 22 October 2013 02:39 knows that the documentation preserved and kept from e.g Concentration Camp Auschwitz is utterly incomplete. Thus nobody is in a position to clear up the destiny of Jews for a lack of pertinent documents. Have a letter in front of me from ITS in Bad Arolsen stating this. Have also asked them about how many Jews were killed. ITS does not want to say "because there are so many Holocaust deniers out there".

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